Wednesday, 4 May 2011

Vesalius and da Vinci: contributions to anatomical artwork

I'm sure you all have guessed that I am a big fan of artwork. Some of these pieces may be graphic, but they are all amazing works of art in my opinion. Enjoy :)

The images below are present in Andreas Vesalius' (December 31, 1514 - October 15, 1564) revolutionary book, De humani corporis fabric (on the fabric of the human body). Vesalius was born in Brussels, Habsurg Netherlands. He was only 14 when he started higher education attending the University of Louvain in the faculty of arts. He became a student of medicine at the age of 18 at the University of Paris and earned his doctorate at the University of Padua. His most significant contribution to medicine was his work, Fabrica, which he published at the age of 28. Vesalius' work appears to be quite shocking at first glance, and becomes even more cryptic when one is told the true nature of his anatomical models. He would illegally hire his students to dig up corpses after dark in order to acquire the corpses. He would then have them dissected, would fashion them in allegorical poses, and hired artists to draw his models for Fabrica

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/historicalanatomies/
Images/1200_pixels/Vesalius_Pg_174.jpg

De humani corporis fabrica libri septem Vesalius (1953)
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/historicalanatomies
/Images/1200_pixels/Vesalius_Pg_165.jpg

De humani corporis fabrica libri septem Vesalius (1953)


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb
/e/ee/Vesalius_Fabrica_fronticepiece.jpg/255px-Vesalius_Fabrica_fronticepiece.jpg

De humani corporis fabrica libri septem Vesalius (1543)

I have included anatomical artwork by Leonardo da Vinci (April 15, 1942 - May 2, 1519). Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo was not just an artist, he was also heavily involved in the sciences. He was a true polymath, and had many fields of expertise: geology, architecture, music, engineering, mathematics, writing, painting, and sculpting. Leonardo is one of my major forms of inspiration as he did not limit himself by any means. He challenged himself and, in my opinion, was one of the most creative minds in history.
http://www.caroltorgan.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Leonardo-hands.jpg
Leonardo da Vinci 

1 comment:

  1. Hey! I'm a fan of Da Vinci too. I guess everyone is!
    If you think Vesalius' method of obtaining bodies for dissection was crude, you must read about Burke and Hare, and Dr. Knox. Dark times they were!
    Good day! :)

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